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With medical bills getting more and more expensive, it seems that people will fight more about whether or not medical bills are reasonable and necessary. In Illinois, for a party to introduced bills into evidence, they are required to prove that the bills are reasonable, necessary, and related. Usually, by the end of the case the defense has agreed to stipulate to allow the medical bills into evidence. Plaintiffs often use requests to admit in an attempt to get the defense to agree to allow the bills into evidence. Typically, the defense will refuse to admit the pills are reasonable unnecessary in writing, requiring an agreement orally, which then gets confirmed my email or letter. Defense may hire experts to rebut the plaintiff’s evidence about the reasonableness and necessity of bills, but they rarely do.

The collateral source rule permits a party to offer evidence of what is reasonable and necessary, but prohibits testimony about what a collateral source, a third party, like an insurer, actually pays for services. This is based on the principal that a tortfeasor, (the person who did wrong and caused the need for medical bills) should not get the benefit of plaintiff’s insurance agreements.

In the case Verci vs. High Plaintiff incurred over $1,000,000 in medical expenses, so the defense decided to fight about it. Defense hired an expert, Rebecca Reier to claim that the charges of Dr. Kube, who charged the great majority of the bills, were unreasonably high.

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